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Listen: Mack Wilds Drops ‘Love In The 90z’

Photo Credit: YouTube

Photo Credit: YouTube

By: Amanda Anderson-Niles

R&B singer and actor Mack Wilds loves to work on his music while he racks up the acting gigs, and his debut album “New York: A Love Story,” earned him a Grammy nomination.

He’s hoping he can make a bigger splash with his new music, and it appears he’ll be paying homage to the 90s era of music.

His new track “Love In The 90z” is a good continuation.

Click next for the details.

Urban Belle Magazine

Chris Brown Doesn’t Want Another Karrueche Tran

Photo Credit: YouTube

Photo Credit: YouTube

By: Amanda Anderson-Niles

R&B singer Chris Brown’s off and on public romance with Karrueche Tran ended on a sour note because she found out he fathered a daughter outside the relationship, and she had to learn about Royalty from the blogs.

Since the split, Karrueche is trying her hardest to have a career separate from her former relationship with Chris, but it’s been difficult for her to get folks to move on from her former ties with her very famous ex.

However, Chris is ready to move on and he’s hoping his next girlfriend won’t be anything like Karrueche.

Click next for the details.

Urban Belle Magazine

Watch: Kenya Faces off with Shamea + Porsha and Cynthia Collide

Photo Credit: Bravo

Photo Credit: Bravo

By: Amanda Anderson-Niles

The current season of “Real Housewives of Atlanta” is only three episodes in but it’s pretty clear the drama will be turning up as the season goes on.

For months now there’s been numerous reports regarding Cynthia Bailey and Porsha Williams’ showdown which resulted in Cynthia kicking Porsha in the stomach, and now it appears we will get to see how it all went down on the next episode.

Cynthia claims things went left between them because she felt threatened while they argued.

Click next for the details.

Urban Belle Magazine

Omar Epps Explains Why He Believes Tupac is One of the Greatest

Photo Credit: YouTube/The Real

Photo Credit: YouTube/The Real

By: Amanda Anderson-Niles

When it comes to the greatest rappers of all time list, it can cause a serious debate among pop culture fanatics and Hip Hop heads.

However, most would agree Tupac Shakur is one of the best to ever do it.

But Billboard apparently doesn’t agree because they left him off its top ten list.

Well Omar Epps thinks they didn’t get it right.

Click next for the details.

Urban Belle Magazine

Damon Wayans Reveals Why He’s Quitting Stand-up Comedy + Thinks Obama Makes It Tough

Photo Credit: Ed Schipul

Photo Credit: Ed Schipul

By: Amanda Anderson-Niles

Damon Wayans made headlines recently because he made a pretty controversial “joke” about Bill Cosby’s accusers, and it caused him to get dragged something serious on social media.

To refresh your memory, here’s what he said about the situation during his Breakfast Club appearance:

“Tell the truth. If I was him, I would divorce my wife, give her all my money and then I would go do a deposition. I would light one of [those] three-hour cigars. I’d have some wine and maybe a Quaalude and I would just go off, because I don’t believe that he was r*ping. I believe he was in relationships with all of them and then he’s like, ‘You know what? [I’m] 78. It don’t work like that no more. I can’t get it up for any of y’all. Bye, b*tches,’ and then they’re like, ‘Oh, really? Rape!

“If you listen to them talk, they go, ‘Well, the first time …’ The first time? B*tch, how many times did it happen? Just listen to what they’re saying and some of them really [are] unr*peable. You just look at them and go, ‘You don’t want that. Get outta here.’”

When the media slammed him for the comments, he once again specified it was just jokes but the controversy has made him quit stand-up comedy.

Click next for the details.

Urban Belle Magazine

Kerry Washington Explains Why She’s Thankful & Praises Her Husband

Photo Credit: ABC

Photo Credit: ABC

By: Amanda Anderson-Niles

Kerry Washington’s career has really taken off thanks to the success of ABC’s drama “Scandal,” but her success hasn’t stopped her from understanding her privilege.

The actress is fully aware her life could have turned out completely differently and that’s why she thinks it’s important to keep that in perspective.

In her recent speech at the Baby2Baby gala in Culver City (Kerry was the honoree), she brushed up on remaining humble and not being disconnected from the less unfortunate.

Variety writes:

In her speech, Washington shared her experience going to her obstetrician in Beverly Hills, whose husband worked with less privileged women. “I would ask about these other women because I would try to put myself in their shoes and make sense of their life versus my life,” Washington said. “Try to make sense of this little girl from the Bronx who suddenly was walking into a doctor’s office in Beverly Hills — try to make sense of the fact that I come from a neighborhood where really by now I should have five kids and no degree and maybe be on unemployment.” The actress said the experience forced her to reconcile her own privilege. She stopped thinking about less fortunate families as “other” and urged everyone at the gala to close the gap in their minds as well.

Although Kerry likes to stay mum about her husband Nnamdi Asomugha, she took time to give him props in her speech.

Click next for the details.

Urban Belle Magazine

Hans Abrahamsen Wins The Grawemeyer Award For Music

Danish composer Hans Abrahamsen has won this year's Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition for his song cycle let me tell you. It's his first vocal work.

Danish composer Hans Abrahamsen has won this year’s Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition for his song cycle let me tell you. It’s his first vocal work. Lars Skaaning/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Lars Skaaning/Courtesy of the artist

A 30-minute song cycle for soprano and orchestra called let me tell you, by Danish composer Hans Abrahamsen, has been named the winner of the 2016 Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition. The prize, which includes $ 100,000, was slated to be announced Nov. 30 by the University of Louisville, which sponsors the annual award. But the after the classical music website Musical America accidentally leaked the information, the official statement was released Tuesday.

Abrahamsen, 62, collaborated with author and music critic Paul Griffiths, who wrote the texts for the piece based on his own short novel called let me tell you. Griffiths started with the 480 or so words allotted to the character Ophelia in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, then reworked them in various combinations to reveal a contemporary Ophelia eager to tell her own story. “My words may be poor but they will have to do,” she says near the beginning of the work.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts let me tell you with the Rotterdam Philharmonic in March 2014.

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“The vocal lines exquisitely mirror Griffiths’ fragile texts of the doomed Ophelia,” said Mark Satterwhite, director of the Grawemeyer Award. “The orchestra is a partner rather than mere accompanist and the composer draws a huge array of colors from the orchestra, delicate and shimmering more often than not, but occasionally in fuller force.”

Abrahamsen, a native of Copenhagen, began writing music at an early age, publishing pieces when he was 16. By age 30 he already had an orchestral work commissioned by the Berlin Philharmonic. He studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Music, where he now teaches. Among his teachers were Per Nørgård and György Ligeti (a Grawemeyer winner in 1986).

Abrahamsen dabbled with writing vocal music back in the 1970s, but says that let me tell you is his first vocal piece, and something of a breakthrough for him.

“My music has always been full of pictures and feelings,” he said by phone from his home in Kongens Lyngby, near Copenhagen. “But now these pictures come out more with text and therefore somehow there has been some kind of step [forward] in this piece, which I understood when I wrote it.”

One of the keys to the success of let me tell you is soprano Barbara Hannigan, for whom it was written. A fearless champion of new music, Hannigan has premiered some 80 pieces and was recently praised for her performances in Written on Skin, an opera by George Benjamin that received its U.S. stage premiere at this summer’s Mostly Mozart Festival in New York. At one point in the conception of let me tell you, she gave Abrahamsen a crash course on the history of vocal music, singing for him excerpts of Mozart, Mahler and Schoenberg, and instructing him in the finer points of her silvery, flexible voice.

It was also Hannigan who asked the Berlin Philharmonic if they wanted to commission the work. That orchestra, led by Andris Nelsons, gave the piece its world premiere Dec. 20, 2013.

For Abrahamsen, winning the award is a dream come true. “I remember the first time I heard about the award and heard that Lutosławski and Ligeti and others who won,” he says. “I knew it was, and still is, a very prestigious prize. So when I heard that I had received it, I became very honored and very happy.”

The piece will be heard first in the U.S. in performances by Hannigan, the Cleveland Orchestra and music director Franz Welser-Möst in Cleveland and New York in January. A recording will be released Jan. 8 on the Winter & Winter label, and Boston Symphony Orchestra performances with Hannigan and Nelsons follow in February.

“I have the feeling that in this piece I have made something which is perhaps more open but still full of mystery, and, for me, what I’m searching for,” Abrahamsen says. “When I did the piece I felt everything came into its right place.”

Music News : NPR

An Artist Grows Into His Talent: Revisiting Sinatra's Radio Years

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Frank Sinatra in 1947, during a Songs by Sinatra radio broadcast at CBS Radio in New York City.

Frank Sinatra in 1947, during a Songs by Sinatra radio broadcast at CBS Radio in New York City. Sony Legacy hide caption

toggle caption Sony Legacy

Nancy Sinatra has said some of her best childhood memories are of listening to her father over the air. His radio shows, from the beginning of his career through the 1950s, brought him home in her mind while he was away singing in clubs and ballrooms. For the rest of the nation, however, those broadcasts went beyond sentimental: They’re what made Frank Sinatra a star.

In honor of Sinatra’s 100th birthday next month, those rare radio appearances are now out in a box set titled Frank Sinatra: A Voice on Air (1935-1955). NPR special correspondent Susan Stamberg spoke with the set’s producer to find out what it reveals about an artist growing into his talent — beginning with the days well before the screaming teenagers and the buttercream voice. Hear her report at the audio link.

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Music News : NPR

Tom Cruise Has Not Seen Daughter Suri In 800 Days — Report

Tom Cruise Abandons Suri